Kinesthetic Learning: Movement Exercises Your Mind

Research
   MAKE YOUR MIND MOVE Students in lecture-based classes are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in classes with kinesthetic, multi-sensory, movement-based learning (Jordt, Wenderoth 2014). Similarly, 68 percent of high school students in the United States do not have daily physical activity (Grunbaum et al., 2002). What do both of these things have in common? Students are sitting in class and not exercising their minds. Kinesthetic learning through movement helps: Strengthen learning Improve memory Enhance motivation STRENGTHEN LEARNING Classrooms across the nation have seen positive changes in students' self-discipline and test scores. The reason why? Their teachers are incorporating cross-body movements, chanting, skip-counting, songs, and dance into subjects like math, reading, and even science. When students learn through movement, it strengthens their academics and their overall love…
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5 Reasons Why Social-Emotional Learning Should Be Taught in School

Research
        1) Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) keeps students engaged in school In early elementary school, children learn how to play and be a good friend. Then, as students go through school, they become less engaged with social-emotional learning. Instead, they focus on academics through standardized testing and following school discipline. “In a national sample of 148,189 sixth to twelfth graders, 29%–45% reported that they had…empathy, decision making, and conflict resolution skills…only 29% indicated that their school provided a caring, encouraging environment” (Benson, 2006). 2) SEL helps students with emotions and relationships Students need social-emotional learning (SEL) as much as math, writing, or any other subject. SEL “builds children’s skills to recognize and manage their emotions, appreciate the perspectives of others, establish positive goals, make responsible decisions, and handle…
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Spatial Learning for At-Risk Students

Spatial Learning for At-Risk Students

Research, Uncategorized
From At-Risk to Einstein: Could Kinesthetic and Spatial Learning Be the Answer to Helping At-Risk Students Succeed?   Where Standard Learning Falls Short The average five-year-old can have an attention span of five minutes. These short five minutes makes it challenging for educators to effectively communicate key concepts. Especially when they are sitting near talkative or restless peers or content is not presented in their natural learning style. Standard teaching approaches often focus on auditory methods and leave out kinesthetic and visual learners. “Because adolescents have not biologically developed strong auditory skills, at-risk students are particularly unlikely to remember at least 70 percent of what they hear or read and thus either do not read well or cannot maintain concentration when they are not interested in the required reading” (Honingsfeld,…
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When It Is Ideal to Compare Yourself to Others

When It Is Ideal to Compare Yourself to Others

Research
By Suzy Koontz A very powerful assessment technique utilized by Math & Movement is the process of pre and post-testing participants. This gives us the ability to see how efficient our methods are for the topics covered during a short term event or a longer term implementation of the program in a classroom. This method is terrific for showing how participants improve their skills, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. For that, we need to compare these scores to scores from a control group. While we have known that comparing our participants to a control group is the ideal approach for demonstrating the effectiveness of the Math & Movement program, it has been challenging to get that kind of data; teachers have been overwhelmed with required assessments and we…
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