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ACEs and Learning

ACEs and Learning

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The Effects of ACEs on Learning What are ACEs? Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) are any instances of abuse, neglect, or trauma experienced by a minor (Center for Disease Control 2019). Examples of ACEs are health problems, divorce, sexual and physical abuse, and emotional and physical neglect (Jarvis, 2018). A study of 17,000 participants found that 64% of people had one ACE and 12.4% had four or more (The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2013). Furthermore, children with at least one confirmed ACE probably have more than one ACE(Mersky, Topitzes, & Reynolds, 2013).  ACEs can have a major impact on a student's ability to learn. Research shows that higher dropout rates, low academic achievement, and lower school engagement are more common with students with ACEs. Shockingly, students with three or more ACEs…
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A Week With Math & Movement

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A Week With Math & Movement Got some antsy kids running around with too much energy and not enough to keep them busy? Our next challenge, #aweekwithmathandmovement, might be just the thing for you to do with them! Why not practice math skills and get some of that endless energy out? Download our printable calendar here that your kids can check off each day once they complete the activity posted here on our account! This calendar also features a sneak peek of each day’s activity. 😉 Click the image to download the calendar PDF! We will start posting the movement on Sunday, June 28th, so make sure to follow us on Instagram to stay up-to-date! Teachers, feel free to send this out to parents! If you take any pictures or…
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Shopping Activity For The Hundred Number Grid

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Shopping Activity for the Hundred Number Grid https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FOD3jXGkcE&feature=youtu.be This is Suzy Koontz’s Add/Subtract Mat, a giant hundred number grid perfect for elementary student activities. This mat features large and colorful numbers where students visualize and make sense of number patterns.  In this video, students played a shopping game to practice working with prices. First, the students wrote down some of the things they wanted to buy. They also guessed how much they thought those objects would cost. When trying this activity at home, have your students write down this information (object and price) to practice writing skills. Next, the students threw the bean bag on the mat. The number where it landed acts as the 'actual price' of the item in the store. Then, they added or subtracted, finding the difference…
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Famous Black Mathematicians and Their Contributions

Famous Black Mathematicians and Their Contributions

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8 Famous Black Mathematicians and Their Contributions Happy Juneteenth! On June 19, 1865, enslaved African Americans in Galveston Bay, TX were notified that they, along with the more than 250,000 other enslaved black people in the state, were free by executive decree. The contributions of African Americans throughout our nation’s history are numerous and significant. Today, we want to highlight and celebrate the Black mathematicians who have greatly impacted our nation and the future of mathematics. Benjamin Banneker (1731-1806) Benjamin Banneker was a primarily self-educated mathematician and astronomer. He is best known for building America's first clock at the age of 24 - a wooden device that struck hourly. He also was able to accurately forecast lunar and solar eclipses. Banner's deep curiosity and understanding of mathematics greatly paved the way years before…
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Fun Activities To Get You and Your Child Excited About Learning

Fun Activities To Get You and Your Child Excited About Learning

Activities, Blog
Fun Activities to Get You and Your Child Excited About Learning Parent Engagement and Math A parent’s self-confidence in math is said to be “the strongest predictor of mathematics achievement” [1]. If a parent doesn't understand the material a student is learning, don’t feel confident in the content, or if they simply dislike math, these feelings can easily be passed down to their child. Good news! There are many ways to overcome the barriers that can prevent parent engagement in student learning. Feeling a lack of inspiration for engagement activities? We have compiled a list of some activities for you and your student to try! Even though most schools will be ending this month, you can try these out this summer at home, and carry them into fall! 7 Ways…
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The Importance of Parental Engagement

The Importance of Parental Engagement

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The Importance of Parental Engagement And what it really means. Joining the PTA, chaperoning field trips, and running school bake sales can come to mind when picturing parental engagement. But is that what parental engagement is really about? Not necessarily. These types of activities are parental involvement. They are incredibly important for supporting the school, teachers, and students’ attitudes about education. Parental engagement, on the other hand, has the potential to deepen the trust that you are invested in your child’s education and also improve their educational achievement [1]. Parental engagement is defined as “parents and teachers sharing a responsibility to help their children learn and meet educational goals” [2]. Parents can help by assisting with homework and encouraging fun, educational activities during a child’s free time [1]. To put in…
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6 Ways to Thank a Teacher This Week

6 Ways to Thank a Teacher This Week

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6 Ways to Thank a Teacher This Week This year, Teacher Appreciation Week looks a little different. With schools closed nationwide and online alternatives to education becoming the current teaching method, everyone has had to adjust tremendously. Parents, students, and especially teachers, have had to adjust quickly to a type of schooling that most have never experienced before. Teachers deserve to be appreciated every day. Right now, they are navigating unknown and challenging circumstances and we are blown away by their resilience. Here are six ways to thank your child's teacher this week: Record a video message of you and your child, thanking the teacher for all that they have done.  Let your child design a digital card or color a picture that shares their appreciation for their teacher and all…
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We Have a Math Crisis. Here’s How to Solve It.

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We Have a Math Crisis. Here's How to Solve it. Americans are lagging behind other countries in math. Many students have difficulty with math from an early age that affects their entire math education. This so-called 'math crisis' stems from students’ difficulty in understanding math concepts. Innumeracy-- what John Allen Paulos calls “the mathematical equivalent of not being able to read”--has become a long-term trend among American students. In 2012, the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) evaluation of 15-year-old students’ math scores found that Americans rank 24 out of 29 industrialized nations. America ranks behind 23 countries including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and Spain. In recent years, this trend hasn’t shown signs of improvement. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics found that, in 2018, only 25% of American…
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Home Study Tips For School Closure

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10 Home Study Tips to Prepare Parents and Teachers for School Closures Many schools have closed their doors and encouraged teachers and parents to adopt a home study plan until it’s possible to re-open. In the meantime, students still need to complete their classwork. Teachers and parents should work together to make sure students have the resources and guidance they need to excel at school. Check out these ten tips for transitioning students to home study and online classrooms.Online Classroom Transition Tips for Teachers1. Plan Homework AheadTo make sure students stay on track with school curriculum, look ahead in your lesson plan. Create a take-home packet with any class work, homework, and extra materials students might need. Include a list of instructions for parents to guide student learning.2. Keep Parents…
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Cartesian Coordinate Hop Floor Mat

Blog, Products
Mat of the Month: Cartesian Coordinate Hop March means standardized testing is just around the corner. Some states began their testing periods this week! So your middle school students will need to practice using a Cartesian coordinate plane. Using kinesthetic and tactile learning techniques turns extra drills into fun math games and activities. It also improves memory, strengthens neural pathways created during learning, and enhances motivation. Math & Movement’s Cartesian Coordinate Hop floor mat uses tactile learning strategies to help students practice their graphing skills. Each mat contains an x-y axis so you don’t have to set one up. Just roll it out and start your lesson! This mat is also available as a desk sticker for individual desk work and group classwork. Kinesthetic and Tactile Learning for Graphing Our…
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